Seminar in Cognitive Science PSY 625

Syllabus V 1.2

Jan. 20

Introduction, what is cognitive science?
Jan. 27
Topic: Modeling the mind

Readings: Turing (1950) Searle (1980)
Feb. 3
Topic: Computing in CogSci The architecture of cognition

Reading: Pylyshyn (1989) Jeanne Fodor (1995) Ron
Feb. 10
Topic: Experimental methods in CogSci

Reading: Bower & Clapper(1989) John
Feb. 17
Topic: Symbolic Models

Reading: Newell, Rosenbloom & Laird (1989) , DanBBS replies to Newell (1992)
Feb. 24
Topic: Connectionist Models

Reading: Rumelhart(1989), Ron McClelland (1995)
March 3
No Class Spring break
March 10
Topics: Modularity of Mind and symbol grounding

Reading: Fodor (1985) Harnad (1990)Dan

Assignment: Abstract of project proposal due
March 17
Topic: How should we consider the brain in CogSci?

Reading: Sejnowski, (1995) Sejnowlski, & Churchland, (1989). Amber
March 24
Topic: Rational models of cognition

Reading: Anderson (1993), Mark Anderson & Schooler (1991)Amber
March 31
Topic: Dynamical systems and cognition

Reading: vanGelder & Port (1995) Mark

Assignment: Two page project proposal due
April 7
Topic: Evolutionary Psychology and Cog Sci

Reading: Cosmides & Tooby (1994), Victor Cosmides, Tooby & Barkow (1992)
April 14
No class
April 21
Topic: Evolutionary Psychology and Cog Sci

Reading: Dunbar (1993), Victor Excerpts from Donald (1991) (
April 28
Topic: Rethinking Innateness Elman, et al (1997) Jeanne
May 5
Assignment: In class paper presentations

Likely readings:

Anderson, J. R. (1993) Rules of the mind. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

Anderson, J. R. & Schooler, L. J. (1991) Reflections of the environment in memory. Psychological Science, 2 396-408.

Bower, G. H. & Clapper, J. P. Experimental methods in cognitive science. In M. Posner (ed.) Foundations of Cognitive Science, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Brooks, R. (1991). Intelligence without representation. Artificial Intelligence, 47 139-59.

Chase, W. G. & Ericsson, K.A. (1982) Skill and working memory. In G.H. Bower (ed.), The psychology of Learning and Motivation (vol. 16, pp. 1-58). New York: Academic Press.

Cosmides, L. and Tooby, J. (1994). Beyond intuition and instinct blindness: Toward an evolutionarily rigorous cognitive science. Cognition, 50, 41-77.

Cosmides, L., Tooby, J., and Barkow, J.H. (1992). Introduction: evolutionary psychology and conceptual integration. In J. H. Barkow, L. Cosmides and J. Tooby (eds), The adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture, New York: Oxford University Press.

Donald, M. (1991). Origins of the Modern Mind:: Three states in the evolution of culture and cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Dunbar, R. (1993). Coevolution of neocortical size, groups size, and language in humans. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 16, 581-735.

Elman, J. L. Bates, E. A., Johnson, M. H., Karmiloff-Smitth, A., Parisi, D., Plunkett, K. Rethinking Innateness: A connectionist perspective on Development. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Fodor, J. (1985). Precis of The Modularity of Mind Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 8 1-5.

Fodor, J. (1995). The folly of simulation. In P. Baumgartner and S. Payr (eds.) Speaking Minds: Interviews with twenty eminent cognitive Scientists. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press

Harnad, S. (1990). The symbol grounding problem, Physica D, 42, 335-346.

Marr, D. (1982). Vision. San Francisco: Freeman.

McClelland, J. (1995). Toward a pragmatic connectionism. In P. Baumgartner and S. Payr (eds.) Speaking Minds: Interviews with twenty eminent cognitive Scientists. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press

Newell, A. (1995) The serial imperative. In P. Baumgartner and S. Payr (eds.) Speaking Minds: Interviews with twenty eminent cognitive Scientists. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press

Newell, A. Rosenbloom, P. S., Laird, J. E. (1989) Symbolic Architectures for Cognition. In M. Posner (ed.) Foundations of Cognitive Science, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Newell, A. & Simon H. A. (1963). GPS: A program that simulates human thought. In E. A. Feigenbaum & J. Feldman (eds.) Computers and Thought.

Pylyshyn, Z. W. (1989) Computing in Cognitive Science. In M. Posner (ed.) Foundations of Cognitive Science, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Rumelhart, D. E. (1989) The architecture of Mind: A connectionist Approach. In M. Posner (ed.) Foundations of Cognitive Science, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Searle, J. R. (1980) Minds, brains, and programs, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 3, 417-457.

Sejnowski, T. J. (1995) The hardware really matters. In P. Baumgartner and S. Payr (eds.) Speaking Minds: Interviews with twenty eminent cognitive Scientists. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press

Sejnowlski, T. J. & Churchland, P. S. (1989). Brain and Cognition. In M. Posner (ed.) Foundations of Cognitive Science, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Simon, H. A. (1995). Technology is not the problem. In P. Baumgartner and S. Payr (eds.) Speaking Minds: Interviews with twenty eminent cognitive Scientists. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press

Simon, H. A. and Kaplan, C. A. (1989) Foundations of Cognitive Science. In M. Posner (ed.) Foundations of Cognitive Science, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Sloman, A. (1993). The mind as a control system. In C. Hookway and D. Peterson (eds.), Philosophy and Cognitive Science, Cambridge: The Press Syndicate, University of Cambridge

Sperber, D. and Wilson, D. (1986). Relevance: Communication and Cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University.

Turing, A. M. (1950). Computing Machinery and Intelligence, Mind, 59: 433-460.

VanGelder, T. & Port, R. (1995). It's about time: An overview of the dynamical approach to cognition. In r. Port and t. van Geldger (eds.) Mind as motion: Explorations in the dynamics of cognition, 1-43. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.